Hong Kong’s Third Runway Backed by IATA and Cathay Pacific….

The HK$150 billion project has been backed by both Hong Kong flag carrier  Cathay Pacific, and the International Air Transport Association (IATA), with the interpretation that a third runway is necessary in order to see the aviation industry in Hong Kong flourish.  

Hong Kong’s Third Runway Backed by IATA & Cathay Pacific

Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is set to begin the construction of a third runway and associated infrastructure.

The HK$150 billion project has been backed by both Hong Kong flag carrier Cathay Pacific, and the International Air Transport Association (IATA), with the interpretation that a third runway is necessary in order to see the aviation industry in Hong Kong flourish.

Construction on the third runway is expected to commence next year, to be completed by 2023, and will help Hong Kong International Airport boost capacity to 100 million passengers and 9 million tons of cargo a year by 2030.

IATA have said that HKIA plays a crucial role as an economic catalyst – Hong Kong is home to some 3,500 regional headquarters and boasts a HK$250 billion tourism industry. The airport serves 63 million passengers and processes 4.4 million tonnes of cargo.

“IATA has long been an advocate of the need for a third runway in Hong Kong. And it is in the interest of everyone in Hong Kong to see the aviation industry flourish. Aviation and aviation-related tourism account for 8.2% of the Hong Kong economy. Increasing HKIA’s capacity to be able to serve 100 million passengers and 9 million tonnes of cargo by 2030 will ensure that the airport continues to be a pillar of Hong Kong’s success—provided the expansion is built, financed  and funded wisely,” said Tony Tyler, IATA’s Director General and CEO in a speech to the Foreign Correspondents Club of Hong Kong.

IATA has outlined a framework which will allow Hong Kong’s new infrastructure to be built without increasing airline charges, without placing a burden on taxpayers, without making it more expensive for travellers, without adding an extra burden to shippers and while increasing competitiveness of the hub’s air transport network.

HKIA is consistently profitable, and IATA’s Tony Tyler has suggested the airport use its advantageous financial situation to fund its expansion by borrowing through commercial loans or bonds.

Flag carrier, Cathay Pacific has supported IATA’s suggestions to fund the project by saying that the third runway can be self-funded through existing income streams, especially as the number of passengers moving through the airport continues to grow.

“Hong Kong International Airport is extremely successful. It is the world’s busiest airport for international freight and the third busiest in terms of international passenger traffic. The Airport Authority enjoys the highest net profit of any airport in the world and benefits from strong cash flows, a healthy balance sheet, and growing income from retail and aeronautical streams,” said Ivan Chu, Cathay Pacific Chief Executive.

Cathay Pacific also believes that, as a public body, the Airport Authority should reinvest its income in the development of the third runway, so that the airport can maintain its premier hub status and continue to make an important economic contribution to Hong Kong.

Hong Kong’s air transport network is under pressure to remain competitive, after its share of the market connecting China to the rest of the world shrank from 20 percent to 17 percent between 2005 and 2013.

Its share on the ASEAN to North America market has remained at 10 percent, whereas the airport’s share on ASEAN to European traffic has contracted to 2.4 percent from 3.3 during the same period.

“There are lots of reasons why these changes are happening. The Middle East airlines are proving to be strong competitors with efficient and affordable hubs being a central piece of their success. And hubs closer to Hong Kong continue to improve their offerings to enhance the competitiveness of their networks,” said Mr Tyler.

SOURCE:::::::: Poppy Marello in http://www.routesonline.com

Natarajan

Airline Pax is Lucky to be Alive After Suffering a Mid-Air Heart Attack…

An airline passenger is lucky to be alive after he suffered a mid-air heart attack during a long-haul flight and was saved by three fellow travellers.

The man was midway through a flight from Canada to Hong Kong when he complained of chest pains and his heart suddenly stopped beating.

Luckily, a doctor, a pharmacist and a policeman trained in first aid were all on board and, with the help of crew, kept him alive.

A man suffered a heart attack while flying from Canada to Hong Kong last month, but his life was saved by a doctor, a pharmacist and a policeman who were on board

A man suffered a heart attack while flying from Canada to Hong Kong last month, but his life was saved by a doctor, a pharmacist and a policeman who were on board

He has now made a full recovery in a case which is being used as an example of why portable defibrillators should be carried on all flights.

The dramatic incident, which happened last month, came to light after the doctor involved reported it to the British Medical Journal, which called the episode ‘a remarkable story of survival against all the odds’.

Dr Dave Monks, an anaesthesiologist who has worked at the Royal Free Hospital in London, said the man was taken ill hundreds of miles from the nearest airport in some of the most remote airspace on earth.

Dr Monks said the man told him of striking pains moving from his chest to his head.

The passenger then lost consciousness and had no pulse, causing Dr Monks to ask other passengers for help.

Luckily, a pharmacist who had worked in an intensive care unit and a trained policeman came forward and, using a portable defibrillator, they gave the man an electric shock to get his heart pumping again.

The doctor involved said the incident highlighted the importance of having defibrillators on flights and in training as many people as possible in how to use them

The doctor involved said the incident highlighted the importance of having defibrillators on flights and in training as many people as possible in how to use them

When the man’s health again deteriorated, the brave trio kept him alive using adrenaline from the plane’s medical kit.

The pilot of the aircraft then landed in Beijing, China and the man was rushed to a nearby hospital. Remarkably, he was discharged 10 days later having made a complete recovery.

Dr Monks told Live Science: ‘This guy was extremely fortunate to have this team there.

‘These guys just happened to be on the plane and even with the [basic medical skills] they had, they were able to perform a quite dramatic and sophisticated critical care resuscitation.’

He said the episode shows the importance of keeping defibrillators on passenger planes and training people in first aid.

He cited research that shows people are more likely to have heart attacks on flights due to stress, disturbed sleep patterns and lower levels of oxygen.

One study suggests about 1,000 passengers per year experience sudden cardiac arrest while on flights.

SOURCE:::::mailonline.com

Natarajan

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2743043/Aircraft-passenger-having-heart-attack-flight-saved-doctor-policeman-pharmacist-board.html#ixzz3CLZNuKWD
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