Refugees Who Live on the Sea….

The Bajau people of Malaysia live almost entirely at sea, living in wooden huts on stilts

The Bajau people of Malaysia live almost entirely at sea, living in wooden huts on stilts and fishing throughout the day.Source: Picture Media

SAILING over crystal clear waters, the Bajau people of Malaysia live their lives almost entirely at sea.

Children as young as four catch fish, octopus and lobsters from handmade boats off the eastern coast of Sabah, Malaysia.

Along with their families, they live in wooden huts on stilts and trade their seafood for necessities with islanders in the nearby town of Semporna.

Photographer Ng Choo Kia joined the Bajau people on their pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree trunks, and documented their daily life in a series of pictures.

The 43-year-old, of Penang, Malaysia, says: “The Bajau people are refugees from the Philippines, who now choose to live at sea for their whole life.

Along with their families, they live in wooden huts on stilts and trade their seafood for

Along with their families, they live in wooden huts on stilts and trade their seafood for necessities with islanders in the nearby town of Semporna. Source: Picture Media 

Children as young as four catch fish, octopus and lobsters from handmade boats off the ea

Children as young as four catch fish, octopus and lobsters from handmade boats off the eastern coast of Sabah, Malaysia. Source: Picture Media 

They visit the land only briefly in order to trade fish for rice, water and other staples.

“The Bajau children are all ferocious in catching fish and octopus, as fishing is their main source of income.

“Every day the children get on their handmade pirogue, and equipped with a net and lance, they go off on the search for food.

“The children have no opportunity to go to school, so there are no future prospects for them.”

As refugees, the Bajau people are not allowed to live on land, and so have built wooden huts out at sea.

During the day, they fish and sail around the coast, looking to sell food, before returning to their huts as soon as the sun goes down.

Choo Kia says: “When most people see these photographs they are attracted by the unique scene and the lifestyle these people are living.

“However, in my opinion this is a situation that should be controlled.

“The children should be educated on topics like the environment and hygiene, and I personally do not encourage people to grow up there.”

Despite their tough lives, the Bajau children of Malaysia still find time to play.

Despite their tough lives, the Bajau children of Malaysia still find time to play. Source: Picture Media

The sleep in wooden huts on stilts over water.

They sleep in wooden huts on stilts over water. Source: Picture Media 

The Bajau children are no strangers to working, with these two young boys catching an oct

The Bajau children are no strangers to working, with these two young boys catching an octopus with their hands.Source: Picture Media

It’s an unusual and controversial existence.

It’s an unusual and controversial existence. Source: Picture Media 

Children are born on the water and are destined to live a life completely at sea.

Children are born on the water and are destined to live a life completely at sea. Source: Picture Media

They navigate the waters on pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree

They navigate the waters on pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree trunks. Source: Picture Media

Source……www.news.com.au

Natarajan

One Year on, This Chennai Family Waits for MH 370 Passenger… Whole World Still Looking For Clues…

 

 

Chandrika Sharma(L)was one of the 239 people on board the ill-fated MH370 flight that disappeared while on its way to Beijing on March 8, 2014. In this photograph, she is seen with her daughter Meghna and husband Narendran.

KS Narendran, Chandrika Sharma’s husband, is a shattered man. His wife was one of the 239 people on board the ill-fated MH370 flight that disappeared while on its way to Beijing, one year ago on March 8, 2014.

Sharma had taken the flight on her way to Ulan Bator to participate in a Food and Agriculture Organisation conference to represent the NGO she worked for. Narendran, a management consultant, is a quiet man and has since chosen to keep to himself.

A colleague of Sharma at the NGO she worked at, International Collective in Support of Fishworkers (ICSF), said Narendran did not want to be disturbed. “Till date he has not received any death certificate,” the colleague added

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The couple’s only daughter is studying in a Delhi college and is currently preparing for her annual examinations.

On Friday, Narendran was present at a workshop organised by the NGO where Sharma’s co-workers and government officials paid tribute and spoke about her commitment to the cause and dedicated service to the people.

A stoic Narendran looked on as speaker after speaker narrated their own experiences at the NGO and shared their thoughts about Chandrika Sharma.  The ICSF in its website homepage has a section titled “Waiting for Chandrika Sharma”.

If the massive undersea search for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 turns up nothing by the end of May, the three countries leading the effort will go “back to the drawing board,” Malaysia’s transport minister said on Saturday.

Liow Tiong Lai told a small group of foreign reporters on the eve of the anniversary of the plane’s disappearance that he remains cautiously optimistic the Boeing 777 is in the area of the southern Indian Ocean where the search is ongoing.

Despite the exhaustive search for the plane, which disappeared last March 8 during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, no trace of the jet has been found. Malaysia’s government on January 29 formally declared the incident an accident and said all 239 people on board were presumed dead.

“By the end of May, if we still can’t find the plane, then we will have to go back to the drawing board,” Liow said.

Asked if Malaysia might stop the search if there are no new leads by the end of May, when bad weather usually sets in, Liow said it was “too early to pre-empt anything now,” and that the government would continue to rely on the group of experts leading the hunt.

“We stand guided by the expert team,” he said.

“I am cautiously optimistic it should be in this area,” he said, adding that “we need directions, we need plans, we need to review all the data that we have.”

Ships looking for debris from the plane on the ocean floor off the coast of western Australia have so far scoured 44 percent of the 60,000-square-kilometer (23,166-square-mile) area the search has been focused on, Liow said. In the latest report he received Friday, he said the search team had identified 10 hard objects that still need to be analysed.

Such findings, which often include trash and cargo containers from passing ships, have been common during the search, and so far no trace of wreckage has been located.

Liow said that Australia, Malaysia and China would meet next month to discuss the next steps in the search. Most of the plane’s passengers were Chinese.

Australian transport minister Warren Truss said last week that if the plane isn’t found by May, one option is to expand the hunt beyond the current search zone to a wider surrounding area.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott said on Thursday, “I can’t promise that the search will go on at this intensity forever,” but added that “we will continue our very best efforts to resolve this mystery and provide some answers.”

Liow said an interim report on the investigation – a requirement under international civil aviation regulations – would be presented to the Malaysian government on Saturday and released to the public on Sunday. He didn’t comment on it.

But he outlined measures his government has already undertaken, including plans to upgrade radar systems to cope with bigger traffic volume and a new tracking system on Malaysia Airlines flights that sends aircraft data every 15 minutes, instead of the previous 30 to 40 minutes.

Liow said the government has allocated 700 million ringgit ($190 million) for the improved radar.

He said that the radar upgrade had been in the works even before Flight 370 disappeared. The plane dropped off civilian radar when its transponder and other equipment were switched off shortly after takeoff from Kuala Lumpur, but was tracked for some time by Malaysia’s military radar as it headed south across the country toward the Indian Ocean.

SOURCE:::: http://www.hindustantimes.com

Natarajan