China opens glass-bottomed bridge named ‘Brave Men’s Bridge’….

Visitors walk across the terrifying glass-bottomed bridge in China. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/ CHINA OUT

THIS is not for the faint of heart.

China has opened a glass bottomed bridge hovering 180m metres above the valley floor in Pingjiang county in Hunan province.

Stretching 300 metres long, the glass suspension bridge is named Haohan Qiao, translating in English to ‘Brave Men’s Bridge’ and it’s not hard to see why.

The bridge was originally wooden until its conversion using glass panes 24mm thick and 25 times stronger than normal glass.

Don’t look down. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/CHINA OUT

Don’t look down. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/CHINA OUTSource:AP

It’s a long way to the end. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/ CHINA OUT

It’s a long way to the end. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/ CHINA OUTSource:AP

China also has plans for another glass-bottomed suspension bridge in the Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon area, about 300 kilometres northwest of Shiniuzhai.

When completed, it will be the world’s highest and longest glass bridge at 430 meters long and 300 meters high.

Visitors wear protective shoe coverings as they walk across the bridge. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/ CHINA OUT

Visitors wear protective shoe coverings as they walk across the bridge. Picture: Chinatopix Via AP/ CHINA OUTSource:AP

Source….www.news.com.au

Natarajan

Images of the Day… Super Moon Night …!!!

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan KhannaSource:AFP

 

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan Khanna

 

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit ParanjpeSource:AFP

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit Paranjpe

 

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

 

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

Source…..www.news.com.au

Natarajan

 

The Best Pictures of the Super Moon….

Hello pretty … the full moon rises between clouds in Berlin. Picture: AP Photo/Gero Breloer

LAST night’s spectacular full moon was a treat for many Australian skywatchers, but in other parts of the world it was merely the overture to a total lunar eclipse.

When a full or new moon makes its closest approach to Earth, that’s a supermoon. A combination of a supermoon and a total lunar eclipse has not been seen since 1982 and will not happen again until 2033.

The supermoon rises behind Glastonbury Tor in Somerset, England. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty Images

The supermoon rises behind Glastonbury Tor in Somerset, England. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty ImagesSource:Getty Images

A flock of birds fly by as a perigee moon, also known as a super moon, rises in Mir, Belarus. Picture: AP / Sergei Grits

A flock of birds fly by as a perigee moon, also known as a super moon, rises in Mir, Belarus. Picture: AP / Sergei GritsSource:AP

A perigee moon rises in the sky above the La Concha Beach, in San Sebastian, northern Spain. Picture: AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos

A perigee moon rises in the sky above the La Concha Beach, in San Sebastian, northern Spain. Picture: AP Photo/Alvaro BarrientosSource:AP

Although still about 220,000 miles (354,055 km) away, it was still the closest full moon of the year, about 30,000 miles (48,280km) closer than the average distance. (The moon’s orbit is far from a perfect circle.)

Skywatchers in North and South America, Europe, Africa and western Asia are expected to be able to see the lunar eclipse, when the moon, Earth and sun will be lined up, with Earth’s shadow totally obscuring the moon

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan Khanna

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan KhannaSource:AFP

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit Paranjpe

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit ParanjpeSource:AFP

The full moon rises behind Lisbon’s St. George castle. Picture: AP / Armando Franca

The full moon rises behind Lisbon’s St. George castle. Picture: AP / Armando FrancaSource:AP

The event is due to happen at 10.11pm on America’s east coast (12pm AEST) and the ellipse should be visible for more than an hour, weather permitting.

There won’t be another total lunar eclipse until 2018.

This eclipse marks the end of a tetrad, or series of four total lunar eclipses set six months apart. This series began in April 2014.

The 21st century will see eight of these tetrads, an uncommonly good run. From 1600 to 1900, there were none.

NASA planetary scientist Noah Petro is hoping the celestial event will ignite more interest in the moon. He is deputy project scientist for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, which has been studying the moon from lunar orbit since 2009.

Rising big and full in Lausanne, Switzerland. Picture: AFP / Fabrice Coffrini

Rising big and full in Lausanne, Switzerland. Picture: AFP / Fabrice CoffriniSource:AFP

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

“The moon’s a dynamic place,” Petro said Wednesday. “We’re seeing changes on the surface of the moon from LRO. We’re seeing that it’s not this static dead body in the sky … it’s this great astronomical object that we have in our backyard, essentially. So people should get out and start looking at it.”

Many stargazers, professional and amateur alike, dislike the term “supermoon,” noting the visible difference between a moon and supermoon is slight to all but the most faithful observers.

“It’s not like the difference between an ordinary man and Superman,” said Alan MacRobert, a senior editor at Sky & Telescope magazine. “It really ought to be called a tiny, slightly little bit bigger moon, rather than the supermoon.”

People watch a full moon rising in Berlin. Picture: AP Photo/Gero Breloer

People watch a full moon rising in Berlin. Picture: AP Photo/Gero BreloerSource:AP

Source….www.news.com.au

Natarajan

Pictures of the Day…. Cheetahs on the Top of the World …!!!

 

The look on tourist Mickey McCaldin’s face says it all. Picture: Caters News

The look on tourist Mickey McCaldin’s face says it all. Picture: Caters News Source: Picture Media

All aboard! Picture: Caters News

All aboard! Picture: Caters News Source: Picture Media

Bigger than your average household cat, these cheetahs made themselves at home with these

Bigger than your average household cat, these cheetahs made themselves at home with these tourists. Picture: Caters News Source: Picture Media

There were many other tourists on board, but these cheetah’s took a special liking to Mic

There were many other tourists on board, but these cheetah’s took a special liking to Mickey McCaldin, seated in the back row. Picture: Caters News Source: Picture Media

Picture: Caters News Picture: Caters News

Picture: Caters News Source: Picture Media

These tourists were cautious of their new friends. Picture: Caters News

Source….www.news.com.au

Natarajan

 

Refugees Who Live on the Sea….

The Bajau people of Malaysia live almost entirely at sea, living in wooden huts on stilts

The Bajau people of Malaysia live almost entirely at sea, living in wooden huts on stilts and fishing throughout the day.Source: Picture Media

SAILING over crystal clear waters, the Bajau people of Malaysia live their lives almost entirely at sea.

Children as young as four catch fish, octopus and lobsters from handmade boats off the eastern coast of Sabah, Malaysia.

Along with their families, they live in wooden huts on stilts and trade their seafood for necessities with islanders in the nearby town of Semporna.

Photographer Ng Choo Kia joined the Bajau people on their pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree trunks, and documented their daily life in a series of pictures.

The 43-year-old, of Penang, Malaysia, says: “The Bajau people are refugees from the Philippines, who now choose to live at sea for their whole life.

Along with their families, they live in wooden huts on stilts and trade their seafood for

Along with their families, they live in wooden huts on stilts and trade their seafood for necessities with islanders in the nearby town of Semporna. Source: Picture Media 

Children as young as four catch fish, octopus and lobsters from handmade boats off the ea

Children as young as four catch fish, octopus and lobsters from handmade boats off the eastern coast of Sabah, Malaysia. Source: Picture Media 

They visit the land only briefly in order to trade fish for rice, water and other staples.

“The Bajau children are all ferocious in catching fish and octopus, as fishing is their main source of income.

“Every day the children get on their handmade pirogue, and equipped with a net and lance, they go off on the search for food.

“The children have no opportunity to go to school, so there are no future prospects for them.”

As refugees, the Bajau people are not allowed to live on land, and so have built wooden huts out at sea.

During the day, they fish and sail around the coast, looking to sell food, before returning to their huts as soon as the sun goes down.

Choo Kia says: “When most people see these photographs they are attracted by the unique scene and the lifestyle these people are living.

“However, in my opinion this is a situation that should be controlled.

“The children should be educated on topics like the environment and hygiene, and I personally do not encourage people to grow up there.”

Despite their tough lives, the Bajau children of Malaysia still find time to play.

Despite their tough lives, the Bajau children of Malaysia still find time to play. Source: Picture Media

The sleep in wooden huts on stilts over water.

They sleep in wooden huts on stilts over water. Source: Picture Media 

The Bajau children are no strangers to working, with these two young boys catching an oct

The Bajau children are no strangers to working, with these two young boys catching an octopus with their hands.Source: Picture Media

It’s an unusual and controversial existence.

It’s an unusual and controversial existence. Source: Picture Media 

Children are born on the water and are destined to live a life completely at sea.

Children are born on the water and are destined to live a life completely at sea. Source: Picture Media

They navigate the waters on pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree

They navigate the waters on pirogues, which are long narrow canoes made from single tree trunks. Source: Picture Media

Source……www.news.com.au

Natarajan

The Monkey Buffet Festival in Lopburi, Thailand….In Pictures …

The Monkey Buffet Festival is held every year on the last Sunday of November to promote tourism in Lopburi, well known as monkey city. This year the city spent some 400,000 Thai baht (£7,800) on 2,500kg of fruit including sweetmeat and soft drinks which have been offered in a banquet to monkeys inhabiting the city. The event is held annually to thank the monkeys for drawing tourists in the town.

Macaques tuck into a feast of fruit during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival in front of the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi province, Thailand

Picture: EPA/NARONG SANGNAK 

The Monkey Buffet Festival is held every year on the last Sunday of November to promote tourism in Lopburi, well known as monkey city. This year the city spent some 400,000 Thai baht (£7,800) on 2,500kg of fruit including sweetmeat and soft drinks which have been offered in a banquet to monkeys inhabiting the city. The event is held annually to thank the monkeys for drawing tourists in the town.

This year the city spent some 400,000 Thai baht (£7,800) on 2,500kg of fruit…

Picture: EPA/NARONG SANGNAK 

The Monkey Buffet Festival is held every year on the last Sunday of November to promote tourism in Lopburi, well known as monkey city. This year the city spent some 400,000 Thai baht (£7,800) on 2,500kg of fruit including sweetmeat and soft drinks which have been offered in a banquet to monkeys inhabiting the city. The event is held annually to thank the monkeys for drawing tourists in the town.

including sweets and soft drinks which have been offered in a banquet to monkeys inhabiting the city

Picture: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj 

The Monkey Buffet Festival is held every year on the last Sunday of November to promote tourism in Lopburi, well known as monkey city. This year the city spent some 400,000 Thai baht (£7,800) on 2,500kg of fruit including sweetmeat and soft drinks which have been offered in a banquet to monkeys inhabiting the city. The event is held annually to thank the monkeys for drawing tourists in the town.
Picture: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj  
The Monkey Buffet Festival is held every year on the last Sunday of November to promote tourism in Lopburi, well known as monkey city. This year the city spent some 400,000 Thai baht (£7,800) on 2,500kg of fruit including sweetmeat and soft drinks which have been offered in a banquet to monkeys inhabiting the city. The event is held annually to thank the monkeys for drawing tourists in the town.
Long-tailed macaques enjoy food served to them during the annual Monkey Buffet Festival at the Pra Prang Sam Yot temple in Lopburi, north of BangkokPicture: REUTERS/Damir Sagolj 
SOURCE:::: http://www.the telegraph.co.uk
Natarajan

What it’s Like to Fly on the Most Lavish Suite Class !!! ….Fabulous !!!

Singapore Airlines’ luxurious suite class

IT’S an experience that most of us can only dream of — an airline suite that’s even better than first class. But Singapore-based entrepreneur and frequent flyer Derek Low was lucky enough to score the ultimate plane seat. This is his story.

In 2008, Singapore Airlines introduced Suites Class, the most luxurious class of flying that is commercially available. The Suites are exclusive to their flagship Airbus A380 planes, and they go beyond flat beds by offering enclosed private cabins with sliding doors that cocoon you in your own little lap of luxury.

It also became the first and only commercial airline with a double bed in the sky.

Carlene said the extra room increased their chances of winning “tenfold”.

The bed is incredible. Picture: Derek Low Source: Channel 9

However, the experience comes with a hefty price tag. With round-trip tickets from Singapore to the US costing up to $20,600, it’s completely unattainable for most people.

But then I remembered that most of my personal net worth exists in frequent flyer miles rather than cash. So last month, after splurging an colossal amount of miles, I booked a Suites Class flight to New York City!

This is what I experienced:

Darren was particularly vocal about the situation.

The experience begins at the airport. Picture: Derek Low Source: Channel 9

I arrived at Singapore Changi Airport and proceeded to the Singapore Airlines counters for check-in. As I joined the line, I was promptly greeted by staff: “Good evening sir, how may I help you?”

A sudden realisation hit me and I went “OH NOPE SORRY” and briskly walked away, leaving the lady puzzled. I had almost forgotten that Changi had a luxurious check-in lounge specially for First Class and Suites passengers.

Flying in the Suites also includes an invitation to The Private Room, which is “higher than first class”.

A ticket to luxury. Picture: Derek Low

A ticket to luxury. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I followed a flight attendant past what seemed to be 50—60 people in the Business Class lounge. She walked noticeably fast, seemingly afraid that I would be disgusted by the presence of the working class. Here I was transferred to another attendant who walked me through the First Class lounge, and then through a set of automatic sliding double doors before being transferred to yet another attendant.

Finally, after what seemed like 16 kilometres of secret passageways and being escorted by 3000 people, I arrived at The Private Room, where staff greeted me by name.

Inside the private room. Picture: Derek Low

Inside the private room. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I wasn’t hungry but I’ve heard rave reviews about the dining room. So I ordered a glass of champagne and had the Chicken and Mutton Satay plate … and the Baked Boston Lobster with Gruyere, Emmenthal and Cheddar.

And also the Prime Beef Burger with Foie Gras, Rocket Leaf and Fried Quail Egg. Oh, and a Mango Smoothie too.

A snack before take off. Picture: Derek Low

A snack before take off. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Completely stuffed at this point, I realised it was time for boarding. There was a dedicated jet bridge solely for Suites passengers. Standing at the end of the bridge was a flight attendant ready to greet me: “Good evening Mr Low!”

I realised that they would address me by whatever title I chose in my Singapore Airlines profile and regretted not going with President Low or Princess Derek.

I was escorted to my Suite:

Better than first class. Picture: Derek Low

Better than first class. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I picked the middle one which can be merged with the adjacent suite to form a double bed.

My home for the next few hours. Bliss ... Picture: Derek Low

My home for the next few hours. Bliss … Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

“Would you like a glass of Dom Pérignon, sir?” And I replied the only acceptable response to such a question: “Yes”.

The drinks are flowing. Picture: Derek Low

The drinks are flowing. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

“Sir, would you like a copy of every newspaper we have on-board today?” Sure, why not.

At this point, the crew members came out to personally introduce themselves. Among them was Zaf, the chief steward. As it turns out, he’s the guy in the airline’s safety video.

Hi Zaf. Picture: Derek Low

Hi Zaf. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Zaf told me that there were only three passengers in the 12 Suites, and joked that I could have a bedroom, dining room and living room if I wanted. And so I picked my dining room.

Dom Pérignon and Iced Milo in hand, it was time to take off.

Not a bad spot to eat. Picture: Derek Low

Not a bad spot to eat. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I took this time to check out what was provided on-board the flight. Headphones from Bose, for example.

Not your average airline headphones. Picture: Derek Low

Not your average airline headphones. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

A Salvatore Ferragamo amenity kit, which included a full-sized bottle of cologne.

The amenity kit. Picture: Derek Low

The amenity kit. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Everything else was Givenchy: blankets, pillows, slippers and pyjamas.

Give us the Givenchy. Picture: Derek Low

Give us the Givenchy. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

As soon as the plane reached cruising altitude, I was offered another drink. Seeing that it was almost 1 AM and I was just beginning to indulge in the whole suite experience, I decided to order coffee to stay up.

I don’t know much about coffee, but I do know the Jamaican Blue Mountain costs a lot, so I ordered it. Apparently it’s “by far the most outstanding” option.

Special coffee. Picture: Derek Low

Special coffee. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I unglamorously gulped down the entire cup at once, while pretending to appreciate the finely-balanced traits of the Blue Mountain. I asked Zaf to recommend me a tea, and he quickly brought out a cup of TWG’s Paris-Singapore tea.

He knelt down next to me as I sampled it, telling me about the high quality tea leaves and the hand-sewn cotton tea bags. He told me about the fragrant cherry blossoms and red fruits infused into the tea.

He says that he has been with the airline for 19 years. Within the past three years, he has served Leonardo DiCaprio and Morgan Freeman, in Suites Class. He recommended a movie for me — The Grand BUDAPEST HOTEL, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Off the top of his head, he named the actors and talked about how brilliant their performances were.

Chilling out. Picture: Derek Low

Chilling out. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

As I settled in, supper service began. Having stuffed myself with three entrees back in the lounge, I wasn’t particularly hungry so I settled for a five-course supper. For the appetiser I had the Malossol Caviar with Lobster-Fennel Salad. And after clearing the plate in three bites, I asked for a second plate.

More please. Picture: Derek Low

More please. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

On to my third appetiser, I had the Duck Foie Gras with Shaved Fennel-Orange Salad, Beetroot and Mizuna.

Yum. Picture: Derek Low

Yum. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I picked the Fish Noodle Soup for main course.

There’s nothing fishy about the service. Picture: Derek Low

There’s nothing fishy about the service. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

And Vanilla Bavarois with Raspberry Coulis for dessert.

Sweet. Picture: Derek Low

Sweet. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

After supper, I decided to burn off the kilojoules by walking around the plane. I asked the crew if they could give me a guided tour of the A380 and they willingly obliged.

Stairway to haven. Picture: Derek Low

Stairway to haven. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

When I got back to the suites, the lights were already turned down indicating it was time to sleep.

Sleep time. Picture: Derek Low

Sleep time. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

In the suites, you don’t just lie on a seat that has gone flat. Instead, you step aside while the Singapore Airlines flight attendants transform your suite into a bedroom, with a mattress on top of a full-sized bed. When the adjacent suite is empty, the dividing partition can be brought down to create a double bed.

Zaf and a stewardess went about making the bed. I don’t even know how to express this process in words.

Now that’s service. Picture: Derek Low

Now that’s service. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

It’s folded down. Picture: Derek Low

It’s folded down. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I jumped into bed squealing like a little girl and spent the next hour lounging in all possible positions.

So. Much. Room. Picture: Derek Low

So. Much. Room. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Bliss. Picture: Derek Low

Bliss. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Some people might say this seems to be the loneliest flight ever. And to that, I say this:

Jealous yet? Picture: Derek Low

Jealous yet? Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

And while you’re doing stupid things like that in the suite, you can use the “Do Not Disturb” button for privacy. Through the entire flight, the attendants check on you almost every three minutes without being intrusive or annoying. They just briskly walk past you with quick glance.

I paid a visit to the rest room to change into the pyjamas provided. It’s a rest room, what were you expecting? Ah-hem:

Now this is extravagant. Picture: Derek Low

Now this is extravagant. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

There’s a seat that folds down that’s actually more comfortable than most economy class seats.

Miles better than economy. Picture: Derek Low

Miles better than economy. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

And then I slept. Well, not on the toilet of course. When I woke up, I saw the clock and my heart sank. A little over three hours to Frankfurt Airport. I’d slept for six hours, thousands of dollars worth of the flight. So to cheer myself up, I asked for a chocolate and was handsomely rewarded with two.

Mmm ... chocolate. Picture: Derek Low

Mmm … chocolate. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

We landed at Frankfurt for a two hour layover, and the three of us in Suites Class were escorted to the Lufthansa Senator Lounge which has a spa and hot shower. Getting back on the plane, a new crew was on-board for the final leg of the flight to New York.

It was 8am and I decided to begin the day with a Singapore Sling.

Sling away. Picture: Derek Low

Sling away. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

For breakfast, I used Singapore Airlines’ Book the Cook service. You can pre-order a specific meal before the flight, which is then specially put on-board the flight for you. I had the Lobster Thermidor with Buttered Asparagus, Slow-roasted Vine-ripened Tomato, and Saffron rice. And dessert.

Time for another meal. Picture: Derek Low

Time for another meal. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

When it was time to nap, I didn’t want to trouble the crew for a full double bed, so I opted for a single bed instead. The partition between the two middle suites slides up to form a wall.

Time for another snooze. Picture: Derek Low

Time for another snooze. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Besides, the single bed is plenty spacious on its own.

There’s room to move. Picture: Derek Low

There’s room to move. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Waking up, I was immediately presented with the second meal I had pre-ordered.

Could there BE more food? Picture: Derek Low

Could there BE more food? Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

It was the Grilled Prime Beef Fillet designed by celebrity chef Alfred Portale.

Cannot. Eat. Anymore. Picture: Derek Low

Cannot. Eat. Anymore. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

As we finally landed at New York, a huge problem presented itself — I didn’t want to leave the plane. After being served Dom Pérignon in a double-suite bedroom at 36,000 feet, I’m not sure flying experiences get any better than this.

But eventually I got off the plane, because New York’s not too bad.

New York, New York! Picture: Derek Low

New York, New York! Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied   

SOURCE:::: Derek Low in news.com.au

NATARAJAN