Here is what a Pilot Thinks When the Aircraft loses all of its Engines in the Mid Air….

Last weekend, Singapore Airlines Flight 836 was traveling from Singapore to Shanghai when the twin-engine Airbus A330-343 lost power on both engines over the South China Sea.

Image result for airbus A330-343

Image of Airbus330-343

 

Fortunately, the pilots were able to restore power to the engines, and the flight was able to continue on to its destination.

No injuries have been reported.

Modern turbofan engines are very robust pieces of engineering and tend to be incredibly reliable.

That makes last weekend’s incident an exceedingly rare event.

In fact, experienced A330 pilot Karlene Petitt told Business Insider that in her years flying the popular jet, she has never encountered, in pilot parlance, a “dual flameout.”

So what is an airline pilot thinking when the engines on his or her plane inexplicably lose power?

“What would go through my mind is fly the plane and do everything I can to get the engines started,” Petitt said in an email. “That would be the only thing to think about.”

In the cockpit, pilots are equipped with reference guides which provides guidance and checklists for a wide variety of operational situations – including the loss of power on all engines.

At cruising altitudes – 39,000 ft. in the case of the Singapore jet – the air is very thin and there may not be enough oxygen to get the engines to relight.

However, according to Petitt, “Normally when you get down around 24,000 feet you should be able to get one started because of the denser air at that altitude.”

In the case of Singapore Flight 836, the airliner lost 13,000 feet of altitude before the pilots were able to get the engines going again.

According to Petitt, she would only think about looking for a landing location after realizing she wouldn’t be able to get the engines going.

Depending on how high and how far the airplane is from an airport, the pilot would then determine what would be the appropriate course of action

In past incidents, pilots have chosen a variety of strategies.

In 1983, Air Canada Flight 143 going from Montreal to Edmonton ran out of fuel midway through the flight after the ground crew miscalculated the amount needed for the trip. The pilots were able to glide the twin-engine Boeing 767-200 jet to safety at a retired Canadian military runway that had been turned into a race track.

In 2001, an Air Transat Airbus A330 traveling from Toronto to Lisbon developed a fuel leak while flying over the Atlantic Ocean. The widebody jet lost all power, but the pilots were able to glide to an airport in the Azores Islands.

Miracle on the Hudson

Most famously, US Airways flight 1549 lost both of its engines after colliding with a flock of geese while taking off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport. Due to the low altitude, the pilots didn’t have time to complete the engine restart procedure. Miraculously, Captain Sully Sullenberger was able to successfully guide the Airbus A320 down in the middle of the Hudson River.

In these instances, the pilots were able to safely land their planes with few injuries to the passengers and crew.

“Pilots never stop flying the plane,” Petitt reiterated. “No matter what, we will do what it takes.”

Source….BENJAMIN ZHANG in www.businessinsider.in

Natarajan

Advertisements

” The ’11th’ Seat in AirBus 380 Super Jumbo …!!!

Want to fly on the Airbus A380 superjumbo? Get ready to feel the squeeze. Airbus has proposed a new cabin layout that would add an 11th seat to the super jumbo’s economy cabin.

Introduced this week at the World Aircraft Interior Expo in Hamburg, the new layout features three seats on either side with five seats in the middle section — making the sought-after aisle seat even more coveted. Currently, the vast majority of A380s in service are configured with 10 seats per row in economy with three seats on either side and just four seats in the middle.

According to USA Today, the new 11 across-layout called “Economy Choice” could be installed in new Airbus A380s as soon as 2017.

But why would Airbus want to do this? Airbus is desperate to expand its customer base for the A380. Of the 317 superjumbos ordered, 140 have of them have been bought by one airline — Emirates.

Only 13 airlines around the world operate the mammoth double decker. For such a heavily hyped and expensive aircraft ($US25 billion development cost), the reception for the airlines have not been as warm as expected by Airbus. In fact, the company has not had a single A380 order from an airline since 2013 — and that, unsurprisingly, was by Emirates.

Sadly, this increased load capacity will mean less elbow room for those unfortunate enough to be stuck in “sardine class.”

Source……….www.businessinsider.com.au

Natarajan

Airbus Beluga …. World”s Weirdest Looking Plane !!!

Airbus’ Beluga celebrates 20 years in the air

IT’S the world’s weirdest looking aircraft. The aptly named Airbus Beluga, also known as the A300-600ST Super Transporter, is the whale of the skies and provides a unique way of transporting oversized cargo.

Developed to carry sections of Airbus aircraft from different production sites around Europe to their finally assembly line in Toulouse, France and Hamburg, it is also used to transport special delivery items.

The fleet of five Beluga aircraft perform more than 60 flights each week and each plane can carry a load of 47 tonnes over a range of 1667 kilometres.

This is how you transport your oversized luggage.

This is how you transport your oversized luggage. Source: AP

Its special cargo has included a famous painting from the Musee du Louvres in Paris to Tokyo, helicopters to Australia and a 17.6 metre long chemical tank weighing 39 tonnes.

Space hardware manufacturers also use the Beluga for transporting its space station modules, launch vehicle hardware and delicate satellites as the aircraft can provide temperature controlled conditions for its sensitive cargo.

The Beluga is operated by a three-member crew including two pilots and a loadmaster and has one of the biggest cargo holds of any civil or military aircraft flying today.

Transporting the tail piece of a China Southern plane. Picture: Airbus.

Transporting the tail piece of a China Southern plane. Picture: Airbus. Source: Supplied

The specially designed plane is used to transport military equipment. Picture: Airbus.

The specially designed plane is used to transport military equipment. Picture: Airbus. Source: Supplied

Just a little top heavy. Picture: Airbus.

Just a little top heavy. Picture: Airbus. Source: Supplied

It is specially used for transporting spacecraft. Picture: Airbus.

It is specially used for transporting spacecraft. Picture: Airbus. Source: Supplied

Inside the Beluga sits an aircraft tail piece. Picture: Airbus.

Inside the Beluga sits an aircraft tail piece. Picture: Airbus. Source: Supplied

Aircraft pieces arriving at Toulouse, France. Picture: Airbus.

Aircraft pieces arriving at Toulouse, France. Picture: Airbus. Source: Supplied

A plane inside a plane.

A plane inside a plane. Source: AFP   

SOURCE::: news.com.au

Natarajan