World’s longest non-stop flight takes off…..

The Singapore Airlines flight between Singapore and New York covers a distance of more than 15,000 kms.                                                                                                             

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alm ost five years after stopping the service, Singapore Airlines (SIA) has retaken the crown as the operator of the world’s longest commercial flight.

The Airbus A350-900ULR service between Singapore and New York Newark (EWR) covers a distance of approximately 15,336 km with a block time of 18 hours 45 minutes.

It will initially be served three times a week, departing Singapore on Monday, Thursday and Saturday. Daily operations will commence from 18 October after an additional A350-900ULR aircraft enters service.

The previous longest flight in the world was Qatar Airways’ service between Auckland and Doha, which covers a distance of approximately 14,526 km and takes about 17 hours 30 minutes.

SIA is the world’s first customer for the new A350-900ULR, with seven on firm order with Airbus. The aircraft will be configured in a two-class layout, with 67 Business Class seats and 94 Premium Economy Class seats.

With a maximum take-off weight of 280 tonnes, the A350-900ULR is capable of flying more than 20 hours non-stop.

SIA served the Singapore-Newark until November 2013, when services were suspended after the aircraft used at the time, A340-500s, were returned to Airbus. By the time it was discontinued, the route was a 100-seat all-Business Class flight.

According to figures from Sabre Market Intelligence, the O&D market size between Singapore and New York is about 120,000 passengers annually. In the 12 months to the end of June 2018, Frankfurt, Hong Kong and Tokyo Narita were the top three connecting hubs for passengers travelling between the two cities.

Source….David Casey  in https://www.routesonline.com

Natarajan

 

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World”s 10 Safest Airlines ….

A Lion Air plane is seen in the water after it missed the runway in Denpasar, Bali in April 13, 2013. Photographs: Reuters

Five decades ago, 87 plane crashes took away the lives of 1,597 people.

This was when airlines carried only 141 million passengers, which is 5 per cent of today’s number, says Safety and product rating website AirlineRatings.com.

In 2014, though the number of fatal accidents fell to 21 (one for every 1.3 million flights), Malaysia Airlines’ two planes – MH370 and MH17 – met a fatal end that claimed 537 lives.

December 2014 saw the tragic end of 162 people from Surabaya who were flying to Indonesia when the AirAsia flight crashed due to bad weather.

Safety and product rating website AirlineRatings.com has listed world’s ten safest airlines.

Of 449 airlines which were included in the study, 149 achieved the website’s seven-star safety ranking and almost 50 had just three stars or less.
Take a look at the world’s 10 safest airlines…

A Qantas A380 arrives at its gate at Kingsford Smith International airport in Sydney. Photograph: Daniel Munoz/Reuters

Qantas

Topping the list is Qantas, which has a fatality free record in the jet era, says the report.

Qantas is Australia’s national airline with an impeccable record. AirlineRatings.com editors noted that over its 94-year history, “Qantas has amassed an extraordinary record of firsts in safety and operations and is now accepted as the world’s most experienced airline.”

: An Air New Zealand Boeing 777-300ER featuring livery advertising the film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. Photograph: Neil Hall/ Reuters

Air New Zealand

Air New Zealand ranks second in safety.

Based in Auckland, New Zealand’s national airline operates scheduled passenger flights to 25 domestic and 26 international destinations in 15 countries.

British Airways. Photograph: Reuters

British Airways

Ranked third in safety, British Airways is the UK’s largest airline on fleet size, international flights and destinations.

Photograph: Alex Domanski/Reuters

Cathay Pacific Airways

Cathay Pacific, based in Hong Kong also ranks high on safety.

The airline operates flights across 168 destinations in 42 countries.

Flight attendants serve journalists during a flight tour organized by Emirates airline. Photograph: Reuters

Emirates

Emirates is the largest airline in the Middle East with over 3,500 flights per week.

It operates in 142 cities across 78 countries.

Photograph: Reuters

Etihad Airways

Etihad Airways operates more than 1,000 flights per week to 96 destinations.

Etihad Airways is the fourth largest airline in the Middle East and the second largest airline in the UAE.

An Airbus A330-300 aircraft of Taiwan’s Eva Airlines, decorated with Hello Kitty motifs. Photograph: Reuters

EVA Air

Taiwan-based EVA Airways Corporation operates flights across 40 international destinations in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America.

Photograph: Reuters

Finnair

Finnair is the fifth oldest airline in the world.

It has also been ranked one of the safest airlines in the world with no accidents since 1963.

Image: A Lufthansa Boeing 747-8 taxis after landing at Dulles International Airport. Photograph: Larry Downing/Reuters

Lufthansa 

Lufthansa operates services to 197 international destinations in 78 countries.

It has one of the largest passenger airline fleet in the world.

Image: Singapore Airlines Ltd stewardesses pose next to a business class seat at Changi Airport. Photograph: Edgar Su/ Reuters

Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines ranks amongst the top 10 in terms of international passengers.

It was the first airline to fly the Airbus A380.

Source….www.rediff.com

Natarajan

Qatar Airlines Voted World”s Best Airline 2015…

THE annual Skytrax awards for the world’s best airline has been announced, with a shuffle of key players on this year’s list.

Qatar was voted the best airline for 2015, bumping last year’s winner Cathay Pacific to third place.

It’s not the first time Qatar has claimed the top spot. It won in 2011 and 2012 and has twice been voted runner up. It also took home best airline in the Middle East and best business class seat.

The presitigous Skytrax awards are judged by 18.9 million passengers in 110 countries around the world who vote on factors such as comfort, friendliness of cabin crew and in-flight food.

Qatar CEO Akbar Al Baker told CNN it was a reflection of their staff.

“It’s a very clear accolade on behalf of the staff — they are the real recipients, I’m just their leader”, he said.

AirAsia won the best low-cost airline category for 2015 despite the tragic and fatal cras

AirAsia won the best low-cost airline category for 2015 despite the tragic and fatal crash of flight QZ8501 last year.Source: Getty Images

The top ten airlines included Singapore Airlines, Cathay Pacific, Turkish and Emirates. Qantas came in at number 10 on the list.

In the low-cost airline category AirAsia was voted the world’s best for the seventh year in a row, despite the tragic accident in the Java Sea last year that killed all 162 people on-board flight QZ8501.

Reported in CNN, co-founder and group CEO Tony Fernandes said the award “meant a lot, after all we’ve been through. I wouldn’t normally say the airline industry is sweet, but today it felt sweet.

“We’ve won it seven times, but this one means the most, because of what happened in the early part of this year.”

Other awards included Garuda Indonesia for best cabin crew, Air France for most improved airline, EVA Air for cleanest aircraft cabins and Cathay Pacific for best transpacific airline.

The list of the world’s top 100 airlines for 2015 can be viewed here.

The best airlines for 2015

1. Qatar Airways

2. Singapore Airlines

3. Cathay Pacific Airways

4. Turkish Airlines

5. Emirates

6. Etihad Airways

7. ANA All Nippon Airways

8. Garuda Indonesia

9. EVA Air

10. Qantas Airways

source….www.news.com.au

Natarajan

Here is what a Pilot Thinks When the Aircraft loses all of its Engines in the Mid Air….

Last weekend, Singapore Airlines Flight 836 was traveling from Singapore to Shanghai when the twin-engine Airbus A330-343 lost power on both engines over the South China Sea.

Image result for airbus A330-343

Image of Airbus330-343

 

Fortunately, the pilots were able to restore power to the engines, and the flight was able to continue on to its destination.

No injuries have been reported.

Modern turbofan engines are very robust pieces of engineering and tend to be incredibly reliable.

That makes last weekend’s incident an exceedingly rare event.

In fact, experienced A330 pilot Karlene Petitt told Business Insider that in her years flying the popular jet, she has never encountered, in pilot parlance, a “dual flameout.”

So what is an airline pilot thinking when the engines on his or her plane inexplicably lose power?

“What would go through my mind is fly the plane and do everything I can to get the engines started,” Petitt said in an email. “That would be the only thing to think about.”

In the cockpit, pilots are equipped with reference guides which provides guidance and checklists for a wide variety of operational situations – including the loss of power on all engines.

At cruising altitudes – 39,000 ft. in the case of the Singapore jet – the air is very thin and there may not be enough oxygen to get the engines to relight.

However, according to Petitt, “Normally when you get down around 24,000 feet you should be able to get one started because of the denser air at that altitude.”

In the case of Singapore Flight 836, the airliner lost 13,000 feet of altitude before the pilots were able to get the engines going again.

According to Petitt, she would only think about looking for a landing location after realizing she wouldn’t be able to get the engines going.

Depending on how high and how far the airplane is from an airport, the pilot would then determine what would be the appropriate course of action

In past incidents, pilots have chosen a variety of strategies.

In 1983, Air Canada Flight 143 going from Montreal to Edmonton ran out of fuel midway through the flight after the ground crew miscalculated the amount needed for the trip. The pilots were able to glide the twin-engine Boeing 767-200 jet to safety at a retired Canadian military runway that had been turned into a race track.

In 2001, an Air Transat Airbus A330 traveling from Toronto to Lisbon developed a fuel leak while flying over the Atlantic Ocean. The widebody jet lost all power, but the pilots were able to glide to an airport in the Azores Islands.

Miracle on the Hudson

Most famously, US Airways flight 1549 lost both of its engines after colliding with a flock of geese while taking off from New York’s LaGuardia Airport. Due to the low altitude, the pilots didn’t have time to complete the engine restart procedure. Miraculously, Captain Sully Sullenberger was able to successfully guide the Airbus A320 down in the middle of the Hudson River.

In these instances, the pilots were able to safely land their planes with few injuries to the passengers and crew.

“Pilots never stop flying the plane,” Petitt reiterated. “No matter what, we will do what it takes.”

Source….BENJAMIN ZHANG in www.businessinsider.in

Natarajan

The Birth Of ” Peanut Airline” …!!!

It’s the final week for our Aviation History Month articles, and this week we are looking at airlines between 1980 and 2000.

The Birth of the 'Peanut Airline' - Aviation History Month

1989 saw a Qantas Boeing 747, fly non-stop from London to Sydney, setting a world record for a four engine jet, after having flown 11,000 miles in 20 hours. During the first half of the 1990’s, the industry suffered world recession, and in 1991, international passenger numbers dropped for the first time.  The financial difficulties were aggravated by airlines over-ordering aircraft in the boom years of the late 1980s.

However, in 1993, The 1,000th Boeing 747 came off the production line 26 years after the first 747 was built. By 1997, all EU airlines were given unlimited rights to serve airports in other member states after the European Commission approved new regulations to liberalise air travel within the EU.

Virgin Atlantic

On June 22, 1984, the airline launched its inaugural flight from London Gatwick to Newark, consisting mainly of celebrities and media. The airline celebrated its 1,000,000thpassenger only 4 years afterwards, and in 1999, Richard Branson sold a 49% stake in the company to Singapore Airlines, which was later acquired by Delta Airlines.

VAA

Virgin Atlantic inaugural flight, 1984 [Image by Virgin Atlantic]

Emirates

The airline commenced operations on October 25, 1985, departing Dubai International Airport for Karachi in Pakistan. The airline began operations to Karachi, New Delhi and Bombay using Airbus A300 and Boeing 737 leased aircraft from Pakistan International Airlines. In 1992, the airline became the first to install video entertainment systems in all of its classes throughout its fleet, and in 1995 when the airline celebrated its tenth birthday; it could already boast 34 locations in the Middle East, Far East and Europe.

Emirates

Emirates inaugural flight 1985. [Image by Gulf News]

Ryanair

The airline was established in 1985 with a share capital of £1 and 25 employees, using only a 15-seater Embraer EMB 110 Bandeirante aircraft. By 1990, Ryanair dropped its Business Class product and closed the Frequent Flyer Club, to re-launch as Europe’s first low fares airline, using only Boeing 737 aircraft. 1992 saw more than one million passengers carried in a year for the first time. The airline stopped serving meals and served only snacks instead, leading to the birth of the ‘peanut airline’.

Ryanair

Ryanair ATR 42-300. [Image by airliners.net]

Air China

Air China was established in 1988 after the Chinese Government decided to split the operating divisions of Civil Aviation Administration of China (CAAC) into six separate airlines, including Air China. The carrier was given chief responsibility for intercontinental flights, and took over the CAAC’s long haul aircraft and routes, including its Boeing 747s, 767s and 707s. In 2001, Air China acquired China Southwest Airlines following a merger plan.

Air China

Air China A340

 Jet Airways

Jet Airways was incorporated in 1993 as an air taxi operator with a fleet of four leased Boeing 737-300 aircraft from Malaysia Airlines. The operator became a scheduled airline in 1995, after the Air Corporations Act was abolished, and began its first international operation in March 2004, from Chennai to Colombo.

Jet Airways

Jet Airways A340, 2005, with 1993-2007 livery. [Image by Adrian Pingstone

SOURCE:::: Poppy Marello in http://www.routesonline.com

Natarajan

 

What it’s Like to Fly on the Most Lavish Suite Class !!! ….Fabulous !!!

Singapore Airlines’ luxurious suite class

IT’S an experience that most of us can only dream of — an airline suite that’s even better than first class. But Singapore-based entrepreneur and frequent flyer Derek Low was lucky enough to score the ultimate plane seat. This is his story.

In 2008, Singapore Airlines introduced Suites Class, the most luxurious class of flying that is commercially available. The Suites are exclusive to their flagship Airbus A380 planes, and they go beyond flat beds by offering enclosed private cabins with sliding doors that cocoon you in your own little lap of luxury.

It also became the first and only commercial airline with a double bed in the sky.

Carlene said the extra room increased their chances of winning “tenfold”.

The bed is incredible. Picture: Derek Low Source: Channel 9

However, the experience comes with a hefty price tag. With round-trip tickets from Singapore to the US costing up to $20,600, it’s completely unattainable for most people.

But then I remembered that most of my personal net worth exists in frequent flyer miles rather than cash. So last month, after splurging an colossal amount of miles, I booked a Suites Class flight to New York City!

This is what I experienced:

Darren was particularly vocal about the situation.

The experience begins at the airport. Picture: Derek Low Source: Channel 9

I arrived at Singapore Changi Airport and proceeded to the Singapore Airlines counters for check-in. As I joined the line, I was promptly greeted by staff: “Good evening sir, how may I help you?”

A sudden realisation hit me and I went “OH NOPE SORRY” and briskly walked away, leaving the lady puzzled. I had almost forgotten that Changi had a luxurious check-in lounge specially for First Class and Suites passengers.

Flying in the Suites also includes an invitation to The Private Room, which is “higher than first class”.

A ticket to luxury. Picture: Derek Low

A ticket to luxury. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I followed a flight attendant past what seemed to be 50—60 people in the Business Class lounge. She walked noticeably fast, seemingly afraid that I would be disgusted by the presence of the working class. Here I was transferred to another attendant who walked me through the First Class lounge, and then through a set of automatic sliding double doors before being transferred to yet another attendant.

Finally, after what seemed like 16 kilometres of secret passageways and being escorted by 3000 people, I arrived at The Private Room, where staff greeted me by name.

Inside the private room. Picture: Derek Low

Inside the private room. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I wasn’t hungry but I’ve heard rave reviews about the dining room. So I ordered a glass of champagne and had the Chicken and Mutton Satay plate … and the Baked Boston Lobster with Gruyere, Emmenthal and Cheddar.

And also the Prime Beef Burger with Foie Gras, Rocket Leaf and Fried Quail Egg. Oh, and a Mango Smoothie too.

A snack before take off. Picture: Derek Low

A snack before take off. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Completely stuffed at this point, I realised it was time for boarding. There was a dedicated jet bridge solely for Suites passengers. Standing at the end of the bridge was a flight attendant ready to greet me: “Good evening Mr Low!”

I realised that they would address me by whatever title I chose in my Singapore Airlines profile and regretted not going with President Low or Princess Derek.

I was escorted to my Suite:

Better than first class. Picture: Derek Low

Better than first class. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I picked the middle one which can be merged with the adjacent suite to form a double bed.

My home for the next few hours. Bliss ... Picture: Derek Low

My home for the next few hours. Bliss … Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

“Would you like a glass of Dom Pérignon, sir?” And I replied the only acceptable response to such a question: “Yes”.

The drinks are flowing. Picture: Derek Low

The drinks are flowing. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

“Sir, would you like a copy of every newspaper we have on-board today?” Sure, why not.

At this point, the crew members came out to personally introduce themselves. Among them was Zaf, the chief steward. As it turns out, he’s the guy in the airline’s safety video.

Hi Zaf. Picture: Derek Low

Hi Zaf. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Zaf told me that there were only three passengers in the 12 Suites, and joked that I could have a bedroom, dining room and living room if I wanted. And so I picked my dining room.

Dom Pérignon and Iced Milo in hand, it was time to take off.

Not a bad spot to eat. Picture: Derek Low

Not a bad spot to eat. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I took this time to check out what was provided on-board the flight. Headphones from Bose, for example.

Not your average airline headphones. Picture: Derek Low

Not your average airline headphones. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

A Salvatore Ferragamo amenity kit, which included a full-sized bottle of cologne.

The amenity kit. Picture: Derek Low

The amenity kit. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Everything else was Givenchy: blankets, pillows, slippers and pyjamas.

Give us the Givenchy. Picture: Derek Low

Give us the Givenchy. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

As soon as the plane reached cruising altitude, I was offered another drink. Seeing that it was almost 1 AM and I was just beginning to indulge in the whole suite experience, I decided to order coffee to stay up.

I don’t know much about coffee, but I do know the Jamaican Blue Mountain costs a lot, so I ordered it. Apparently it’s “by far the most outstanding” option.

Special coffee. Picture: Derek Low

Special coffee. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I unglamorously gulped down the entire cup at once, while pretending to appreciate the finely-balanced traits of the Blue Mountain. I asked Zaf to recommend me a tea, and he quickly brought out a cup of TWG’s Paris-Singapore tea.

He knelt down next to me as I sampled it, telling me about the high quality tea leaves and the hand-sewn cotton tea bags. He told me about the fragrant cherry blossoms and red fruits infused into the tea.

He says that he has been with the airline for 19 years. Within the past three years, he has served Leonardo DiCaprio and Morgan Freeman, in Suites Class. He recommended a movie for me — The Grand BUDAPEST HOTEL, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Off the top of his head, he named the actors and talked about how brilliant their performances were.

Chilling out. Picture: Derek Low

Chilling out. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

As I settled in, supper service began. Having stuffed myself with three entrees back in the lounge, I wasn’t particularly hungry so I settled for a five-course supper. For the appetiser I had the Malossol Caviar with Lobster-Fennel Salad. And after clearing the plate in three bites, I asked for a second plate.

More please. Picture: Derek Low

More please. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

On to my third appetiser, I had the Duck Foie Gras with Shaved Fennel-Orange Salad, Beetroot and Mizuna.

Yum. Picture: Derek Low

Yum. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I picked the Fish Noodle Soup for main course.

There’s nothing fishy about the service. Picture: Derek Low

There’s nothing fishy about the service. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

And Vanilla Bavarois with Raspberry Coulis for dessert.

Sweet. Picture: Derek Low

Sweet. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

After supper, I decided to burn off the kilojoules by walking around the plane. I asked the crew if they could give me a guided tour of the A380 and they willingly obliged.

Stairway to haven. Picture: Derek Low

Stairway to haven. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

When I got back to the suites, the lights were already turned down indicating it was time to sleep.

Sleep time. Picture: Derek Low

Sleep time. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

In the suites, you don’t just lie on a seat that has gone flat. Instead, you step aside while the Singapore Airlines flight attendants transform your suite into a bedroom, with a mattress on top of a full-sized bed. When the adjacent suite is empty, the dividing partition can be brought down to create a double bed.

Zaf and a stewardess went about making the bed. I don’t even know how to express this process in words.

Now that’s service. Picture: Derek Low

Now that’s service. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

It’s folded down. Picture: Derek Low

It’s folded down. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

I jumped into bed squealing like a little girl and spent the next hour lounging in all possible positions.

So. Much. Room. Picture: Derek Low

So. Much. Room. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Bliss. Picture: Derek Low

Bliss. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Some people might say this seems to be the loneliest flight ever. And to that, I say this:

Jealous yet? Picture: Derek Low

Jealous yet? Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

And while you’re doing stupid things like that in the suite, you can use the “Do Not Disturb” button for privacy. Through the entire flight, the attendants check on you almost every three minutes without being intrusive or annoying. They just briskly walk past you with quick glance.

I paid a visit to the rest room to change into the pyjamas provided. It’s a rest room, what were you expecting? Ah-hem:

Now this is extravagant. Picture: Derek Low

Now this is extravagant. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

There’s a seat that folds down that’s actually more comfortable than most economy class seats.

Miles better than economy. Picture: Derek Low

Miles better than economy. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

And then I slept. Well, not on the toilet of course. When I woke up, I saw the clock and my heart sank. A little over three hours to Frankfurt Airport. I’d slept for six hours, thousands of dollars worth of the flight. So to cheer myself up, I asked for a chocolate and was handsomely rewarded with two.

Mmm ... chocolate. Picture: Derek Low

Mmm … chocolate. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

We landed at Frankfurt for a two hour layover, and the three of us in Suites Class were escorted to the Lufthansa Senator Lounge which has a spa and hot shower. Getting back on the plane, a new crew was on-board for the final leg of the flight to New York.

It was 8am and I decided to begin the day with a Singapore Sling.

Sling away. Picture: Derek Low

Sling away. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

For breakfast, I used Singapore Airlines’ Book the Cook service. You can pre-order a specific meal before the flight, which is then specially put on-board the flight for you. I had the Lobster Thermidor with Buttered Asparagus, Slow-roasted Vine-ripened Tomato, and Saffron rice. And dessert.

Time for another meal. Picture: Derek Low

Time for another meal. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

When it was time to nap, I didn’t want to trouble the crew for a full double bed, so I opted for a single bed instead. The partition between the two middle suites slides up to form a wall.

Time for another snooze. Picture: Derek Low

Time for another snooze. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Besides, the single bed is plenty spacious on its own.

There’s room to move. Picture: Derek Low

There’s room to move. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

Waking up, I was immediately presented with the second meal I had pre-ordered.

Could there BE more food? Picture: Derek Low

Could there BE more food? Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

It was the Grilled Prime Beef Fillet designed by celebrity chef Alfred Portale.

Cannot. Eat. Anymore. Picture: Derek Low

Cannot. Eat. Anymore. Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied

As we finally landed at New York, a huge problem presented itself — I didn’t want to leave the plane. After being served Dom Pérignon in a double-suite bedroom at 36,000 feet, I’m not sure flying experiences get any better than this.

But eventually I got off the plane, because New York’s not too bad.

New York, New York! Picture: Derek Low

New York, New York! Picture: Derek Low Source: Supplied   

SOURCE:::: Derek Low in news.com.au

NATARAJAN