British Airways Burning Plane….

BRITISH AIRWAYS

Smoke billows out from a plane that caught fire in Las Vegas | ASSOCIATED PRESS

British airways passengers have been ridiculed for walking away from a burning plane, with many people holding their carry-on suitcases, handbags and other items. One passenger was even spotted carrying a pair of thongs.

The London-bound plane was evacuated on the runway in Las Vegas. All 157 passengers escaped with only 14 being treated for minor injuries.

But social media quickly erupted into harsh criticism, as photos surfaced of passengers leaving the plane, clutching their belongings. Hundreds of people used Twitter to accuse the passengers of putting other lives at risk, and valuing their possessions more than their own lives.

British Airways policy is that passengers leave hand luggage behind in the event of an emergency.

The FAA in the US (Federal Aviation Administration), which sets the rules for flying, clearly advises passengers to always leave carry-on items where you left them — under the seat or in the overhead locker.

‘Retrieving personal items may impede the safe evacuation of passengers,’ states FAA guidance.

Lachlan Burnet, from Wendy Wu Tours, catches more than 50 planes a year. He told The Huffington Post Australia it doesn’t matter how many times people watch the flight safety instructions, in the event of an actual emergency, human behaviour is unpredictable.

“There’s a good reason why ladies are asked to remove high heels before attempting to slide down the plane’s evacuation slide, yet some of these British Airways passengers risked lives by sliding down the slide grasping luggage. If they’d damaged the slide, they’d put other passengers lives at risk,” Burnet said.

“I always keep valuables in my pockets: passport, keys, mobile, ID. That way if you’re in an emergency you can escape quickly, rest assured you have what you need to survive with your basic valuables. Your cabin bag can easily be replaced.”

According to experts, you have just 90 seconds to get off a plane once it’s on fire. FAA surveys have shown that passengers greatly underestimate how quickly a fire can spread and destroy an airplane, with many people bizarrely thinking they have about half an hour to get off a burning plane.

But the reality is that you’ve got one and a half minutes before flames burn through the plane’s fuselage and destroy everything.

Source….www.huffingtonpost.com.au

Natarajan

 

 

 

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World”s 10 Safest Airlines ….

A Lion Air plane is seen in the water after it missed the runway in Denpasar, Bali in April 13, 2013. Photographs: Reuters

Five decades ago, 87 plane crashes took away the lives of 1,597 people.

This was when airlines carried only 141 million passengers, which is 5 per cent of today’s number, says Safety and product rating website AirlineRatings.com.

In 2014, though the number of fatal accidents fell to 21 (one for every 1.3 million flights), Malaysia Airlines’ two planes – MH370 and MH17 – met a fatal end that claimed 537 lives.

December 2014 saw the tragic end of 162 people from Surabaya who were flying to Indonesia when the AirAsia flight crashed due to bad weather.

Safety and product rating website AirlineRatings.com has listed world’s ten safest airlines.

Of 449 airlines which were included in the study, 149 achieved the website’s seven-star safety ranking and almost 50 had just three stars or less.
Take a look at the world’s 10 safest airlines…

A Qantas A380 arrives at its gate at Kingsford Smith International airport in Sydney. Photograph: Daniel Munoz/Reuters

Qantas

Topping the list is Qantas, which has a fatality free record in the jet era, says the report.

Qantas is Australia’s national airline with an impeccable record. AirlineRatings.com editors noted that over its 94-year history, “Qantas has amassed an extraordinary record of firsts in safety and operations and is now accepted as the world’s most experienced airline.”

: An Air New Zealand Boeing 777-300ER featuring livery advertising the film The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. Photograph: Neil Hall/ Reuters

Air New Zealand

Air New Zealand ranks second in safety.

Based in Auckland, New Zealand’s national airline operates scheduled passenger flights to 25 domestic and 26 international destinations in 15 countries.

British Airways. Photograph: Reuters

British Airways

Ranked third in safety, British Airways is the UK’s largest airline on fleet size, international flights and destinations.

Photograph: Alex Domanski/Reuters

Cathay Pacific Airways

Cathay Pacific, based in Hong Kong also ranks high on safety.

The airline operates flights across 168 destinations in 42 countries.

Flight attendants serve journalists during a flight tour organized by Emirates airline. Photograph: Reuters

Emirates

Emirates is the largest airline in the Middle East with over 3,500 flights per week.

It operates in 142 cities across 78 countries.

Photograph: Reuters

Etihad Airways

Etihad Airways operates more than 1,000 flights per week to 96 destinations.

Etihad Airways is the fourth largest airline in the Middle East and the second largest airline in the UAE.

An Airbus A330-300 aircraft of Taiwan’s Eva Airlines, decorated with Hello Kitty motifs. Photograph: Reuters

EVA Air

Taiwan-based EVA Airways Corporation operates flights across 40 international destinations in Asia, Australia, Europe, and North America.

Photograph: Reuters

Finnair

Finnair is the fifth oldest airline in the world.

It has also been ranked one of the safest airlines in the world with no accidents since 1963.

Image: A Lufthansa Boeing 747-8 taxis after landing at Dulles International Airport. Photograph: Larry Downing/Reuters

Lufthansa 

Lufthansa operates services to 197 international destinations in 78 countries.

It has one of the largest passenger airline fleet in the world.

Image: Singapore Airlines Ltd stewardesses pose next to a business class seat at Changi Airport. Photograph: Edgar Su/ Reuters

Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines ranks amongst the top 10 in terms of international passengers.

It was the first airline to fly the Airbus A380.

Source….www.rediff.com

Natarajan

” Footage From Cockpit “…Plane Landing in one of the ‘Scariest ‘ Airports in the World…

There’s a belief that computers do all of the work in the cockpit, but this amazing video shows British Airways pilots conquering one of the most challenging runways in the world.

With cameras mounted in the flight deck, the clip shows a pilot’s-eye view as a BA plane approaches and touches down on the runway in Funchal, on the Portuguese island of Madeira.

It may seem like a routine event, but captains Ally Wilcox and Ian Mills had to contend with high winds and were unable to rely on the plane’s instruments as they landed at an airport nestled between the Atlantic Ocean and a hill dotted with home

click and watch the video clip below…

 Captains Ally Wilcox and Ian Mills had to contend with high winds as they approached the runway

Captains Ally Wilcox and Ian Mills had to contend with high winds as they approached the runway

Footage from the cockpit provides a perspective that most passengers will never see as they arrive on the stunning island for a relaxing holiday.

It can be a turbulent landing, and after an extension was built in 2000 part of the runway is on stilts over the sea.

Captain Wilcox narrated the video, which was shot on a recent flight from London, telling viewers Funchal is a unique airfield because pilots cannot land a plane there unless they have special approval from Portugal’s civil aviation authority.

He said BA and Airbus have developed a bespoke plan that has been approved by authorities, which includes using banana sheds as a waypoint to navigate the ‘tricky terrain’ to the left of the runway.

Footage from the cockpit provides a perspective that most passengers will never see

Footage from the cockpit provides a perspective that most passengers will never see In order to land in Funchal pilots must undergo training and be approved by Portuguese aviation authorities

In order to land in Funchal pilots must undergo training and be approved by Portuguese aviation authorities

Only 20 BA captains are permitted to fly into Funchal, and each one had to pass a two-hour simulated training session.

Captain Wilcox said: ‘The island is very tricky because of the terrain … it means we have to fly around the bay and very close to the terrain before completing a curving approach onto the runway.’

As the airport does not have an instrument landing system, pilots must navigate around the bay visually using good judgment, he added.

Funchal is frequently included in lists of the 'scariest' runways in the world due to its challenges

Funchal is frequently included in lists of the ‘scariest’ runways in the world due to its challenges

High winds add to the degree of difficulty.

He tells viewers: ‘As it’s out in the Atlantic the wind is often strong and very variable in nature.

‘As with this approach we faced exactly that challenge with the head wind becoming a cross wind pushing us towards the terrain and here ending up as a tail wind as we landed on the runway.’

Given its location and turbulent winds, Funchal is frequently included in lists of the ‘scariest’ runways in the world.

Source….www.dailymail.co.uk  and http://www.you tube.com

Natarajan

Southern California’s Logistics Airport….” Official boneyard ” for Yester Years Jumbo Jets !!!

The days of the jumbo jet are numbered. Since their debut in the late 1960s, Boeing 747 and McDonnell Douglas DC-10 have been the undisputed queens of the sky.

Unfortunately, the size, four-engine dependability, and range of these big planes are no longer enough of a competitive advantage to justify their operating costs. These relics of the 20th century often end up in places such as the Southern California Logistics Airport – more commonly known as the “bone yard.”

The Southern California Logistics Airport is located in Victorville, California — about 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
The Southern California Logistics Airport is located in Victorville, California — about 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
Due to its location in the Mojave desert, Victorville’s warm and dry climate make it the perfect place to keep aging airplanes for extended periods of time.
Due to its location in the Mojave desert, Victorville's warm and dry climate make it the perfect place to keep aging airplanes for extended periods of time.
Airplanes here have either been retired or declared “surplus” – not needed for immediate operations.
After they arrive, some planes are preserved so they can, one day, return to service with the airline or …
be sold to another airline
Those planes have their windows covered in foil and their fluids drained as they prepare for to sit in the desert for the long haul.
Those planes have their windows covered in foil and their fluids drained as they prepare for to sit in the desert for the long haul.
The aircraft’s engines — the most valuable parts of the plane – are also removed.
However, others — like this ex-Orient Thai Boeing 747 — are broken up and sold for parts.
However, others — like this ex-Orient Thai Boeing 747 — are broken up and sold for parts.
After the valuable parts, such as the electronics, interior trim, and other reusable components have been harvested, the remaining pieces are chopped up and sold for scrap.
As of March 2015, British Airways has quite a few 747s at the bone yard.
As of March 2015, British Airways has quite a few 747s at the bone yard.
The airline has a massive fleet of more than 50 747-400s.
But as the average age of their 747 fleet near 20 years, British Airways is slowly retiring its older birds.
But as the average age of their 747 fleet near 20 years, British Airways is slowly retiring its older birds.
In addition to BA, Singapore Airlines, Air New Zealand, and Cathay Pacific have sent their 747s to Victorville.
In addition to BA, Singapore Airlines, Air New Zealand, and Cathay Pacific have sent their 747s to Victorville.
The Southern California Logistics Airport is located in Victorville, California — about 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
The Southern California Logistics Airport is located in Victorville, California — about 80 miles northeast of Los Angeles.
Due to its location in the Mojave desert, Victorville’s warm and dry climate make it the perfect place to keep aging airplanes for extended periods of time.
Due to its location in the Mojave desert, Victorville's warm and dry climate make it the perfect place to keep aging airplanes for extended periods of time.
Airplanes here have either been retired or declared “surplus” – not needed for immediate operations.
Airplanes here have either been retired or declared "surplus" – not needed for immediate operations.
After they arrive, some planes are preserved so they can, one day, return to service with the airline or …
After they arrive, some planes are preserved so they can, one day, return to service with the airline or ...
… be sold to another airline.
... be sold to another airline.
Those planes have their windows covered in foil and their fluids drained as they prepare for to sit in the desert for the long haul.
Those planes have their windows covered in foil and their fluids drained as they prepare for to sit in the desert for the long haul.
The aircraft’s engines — the most valuable parts of the plane – are also removed.
The aircraft's engines — the most valuable parts of the plane – are also removed.
However, others — like this ex-Orient Thai Boeing 747 — are broken up and sold for parts.
However, others — like this ex-Orient Thai Boeing 747 — are broken up and sold for parts.
After the valuable parts, such as the electronics, interior trim, and other reusable components have been harvested, the remaining pieces are chopped up and sold for scrap.
After the valuable parts, such as the electronics, interior trim, and other reusable components have been harvested, the remaining pieces are chopped up and sold for scrap.
As of March 2015, British Airways has quite a few 747s at the bone yard.
As of March 2015, British Airways has quite a few 747s at the bone yard.
The airline has a massive fleet of more than 50 747-400s.
The airline has a massive fleet of more than 50 747-400s.
But as the average age of their 747 fleet near 20 years, British Airways is slowly retiring its older birds.
But as the average age of their 747 fleet near 20 years, British Airways is slowly retiring its older birds.
In addition to BA, Singapore Airlines, Air New Zealand, and Cathay Pacific have sent their 747s to Victorville.
In addition to BA, Singapore Airlines, Air New Zealand, and Cathay Pacific have sent their 747s to Victorville.
FedEx is also a major tenant.
The cargo carrier is in the process of updating its massive fleet of mostly older jets.
Other airlines include, Air China, Evergreen International, Lufthansa, and United Airlines.
The bone yard is an ever-changing aviation landscape. As old tenants of broken up or sold, new arrivals fresh from mainline service are flown in.
As airlines retire their 747s, one wealthy individual bought a new jumbo to be his private jet…
As airlines retire their 747s, one wealthy individual bought a new jumbo to be his private jet...

Source……..www.businessinsider.in

natarajan

Bitter Experience of a British Journalist with British Airways …

 

British airways boeing 747

A British Airways Boeing 747.

First-class airline tickets are expensive. Prices can easily reach $US15,000 a flight, and that’s not even for the really opulent first-class suites that have become more prevalent on the most prestigious carriers.

Those go for as much as $US30,000.

Just for the sake of comparison, Mercedes-Benz is offering its CLA sedan — an entire car — for $US29,995.

For that kind of money, passengers in first class expect a fine glass of champagne, in-flight entertainment, and an environment free from … dried-on stains and thick layers of dust.

That’s why a YouTube video posted by British journalist Owen Thomas last weekend was so shocking. (CNN originally reported Thomas’ experience.)

In the 29-second video — which has garnered more than 1 million views — Thomas documented his “filthy” first-class experience on board a British Airways jet from London to St. Lucia.

Thomas grows increasingly annoyed as he shows off the “cheap, motel-esque” dried stains and deep layers of dust that encrust his very expensive seat.

“This is British Airways first class and it is absolutely filthy,” the enraged journalist says in the video. “You see the marks on here you can just scrape off with you finger.”

“It’s when you open your seat, the real horror begins. This is first class. This is British Airways first class. It’s disgusting,” Thomas added.

British Airways didn’t let the video pass without comment.

“We have contacted our customer to apologise. We are very sorry that on this occasion we have fallen short of our usual high standards,” a representative for the airline told the Telegraph.

“We pride ourselves on delivering a relaxing and pleasant experience in first class, and are taking immediate action to address this issue.”

Thomas’ encounter with what looks like a fairly offensive level of filth is alarming, given that BA has built a solid reputation in recent years for quality service, especially in the first class cabins. After all, the airline’s motto is “To Fly, To Serve.”

But this incident seems to be the exception rather than the rule. British Airways is a Skytrax four-star airline, and reviews for the carrier’s service are generally positive.

And besides, it’s not as if YouTube is jammed with videos about poorly cleaned first-class seats — on BA’s planes or anyone else’s.

SOURCE::::: BENJAMIN ZHANG  in  www.businessinsider.com .au  and YOU TUBE

Natarajan

Jan 24 2015