Images of the Day… Super Moon Night …!!!

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan KhannaSource:AFP

 

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan Khanna

 

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit ParanjpeSource:AFP

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit Paranjpe

 

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

 

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

Source…..www.news.com.au

Natarajan

 

The Best Pictures of the Super Moon….

Hello pretty … the full moon rises between clouds in Berlin. Picture: AP Photo/Gero Breloer

LAST night’s spectacular full moon was a treat for many Australian skywatchers, but in other parts of the world it was merely the overture to a total lunar eclipse.

When a full or new moon makes its closest approach to Earth, that’s a supermoon. A combination of a supermoon and a total lunar eclipse has not been seen since 1982 and will not happen again until 2033.

The supermoon rises behind Glastonbury Tor in Somerset, England. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty Images

The supermoon rises behind Glastonbury Tor in Somerset, England. Picture: Matt Cardy/Getty ImagesSource:Getty Images

A flock of birds fly by as a perigee moon, also known as a super moon, rises in Mir, Belarus. Picture: AP / Sergei Grits

A flock of birds fly by as a perigee moon, also known as a super moon, rises in Mir, Belarus. Picture: AP / Sergei GritsSource:AP

A perigee moon rises in the sky above the La Concha Beach, in San Sebastian, northern Spain. Picture: AP Photo/Alvaro Barrientos

A perigee moon rises in the sky above the La Concha Beach, in San Sebastian, northern Spain. Picture: AP Photo/Alvaro BarrientosSource:AP

Although still about 220,000 miles (354,055 km) away, it was still the closest full moon of the year, about 30,000 miles (48,280km) closer than the average distance. (The moon’s orbit is far from a perfect circle.)

Skywatchers in North and South America, Europe, Africa and western Asia are expected to be able to see the lunar eclipse, when the moon, Earth and sun will be lined up, with Earth’s shadow totally obscuring the moon

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan Khanna

The moon is seen against the peak of the tomb of Jama Masjid in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Chandan KhannaSource:AFP

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit Paranjpe

The full moon is seen on the city skyline as Indian devotees carry statues of elephant-headed Hindu god Lord Ganesha for immersion in the Arabian Sea in Mumbai. Picture: AFP / Punit ParanjpeSource:AFP

The full moon rises behind Lisbon’s St. George castle. Picture: AP / Armando Franca

The full moon rises behind Lisbon’s St. George castle. Picture: AP / Armando FrancaSource:AP

The event is due to happen at 10.11pm on America’s east coast (12pm AEST) and the ellipse should be visible for more than an hour, weather permitting.

There won’t be another total lunar eclipse until 2018.

This eclipse marks the end of a tetrad, or series of four total lunar eclipses set six months apart. This series began in April 2014.

The 21st century will see eight of these tetrads, an uncommonly good run. From 1600 to 1900, there were none.

NASA planetary scientist Noah Petro is hoping the celestial event will ignite more interest in the moon. He is deputy project scientist for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, which has been studying the moon from lunar orbit since 2009.

Rising big and full in Lausanne, Switzerland. Picture: AFP / Fabrice Coffrini

Rising big and full in Lausanne, Switzerland. Picture: AFP / Fabrice CoffriniSource:AFP

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

An Indian man leans on a wall on top of a building in New Delhi as the moon does time as a backdrop. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto Schmidt

A full moon shines behind a tower of the Jama Masjid mosque in New Delhi. Picture: AFP / Roberto SchmidtSource:AFP

“The moon’s a dynamic place,” Petro said Wednesday. “We’re seeing changes on the surface of the moon from LRO. We’re seeing that it’s not this static dead body in the sky … it’s this great astronomical object that we have in our backyard, essentially. So people should get out and start looking at it.”

Many stargazers, professional and amateur alike, dislike the term “supermoon,” noting the visible difference between a moon and supermoon is slight to all but the most faithful observers.

“It’s not like the difference between an ordinary man and Superman,” said Alan MacRobert, a senior editor at Sky & Telescope magazine. “It really ought to be called a tiny, slightly little bit bigger moon, rather than the supermoon.”

People watch a full moon rising in Berlin. Picture: AP Photo/Gero Breloer

People watch a full moon rising in Berlin. Picture: AP Photo/Gero BreloerSource:AP

Source….www.news.com.au

Natarajan

California’s wildfires are actually changing the appearance of the moon ….

Did you see the Moon last night? I walked outside at 10:30 p.m. and was stunned to see a dark, burnt-orange Full Moon as if September’s eclipse had arrived a month early? Why ?

Bob King in Universe Today….

moon

The Full Moon at 10:30 p.m. last night (Aug. 29). Even at 25 degrees altitude, it glowed a deep, dark orange caused by heavy smoke from western forest fires.

Heavy smoke from forest fires in Washington, California and Montana has now spread to cover nearly half the country in a smoky pall, soaking up starlight and muting the moonlight.

If this is what global warming has in store for us, skywatchers will soon have to take a forecast of “clear skies” with a huge grain of salt.

By day, the sky appears the palest of blues. By night, the stars are few if any, and the Moon appears faint, the color of fire and strangely remote. Despite last night’s clear skies, only the star Vega managed to penetrate the gloom.

I never saw my shadow even at midnight when the Moon had climbed high into the southern sky.
moon2

Last night’s Full Moon seen through an 8-inch telescope at 11:30 p.m. The colors are true.

We’ve seen this smoke before. Back in July, Canadian forest fires wafted south and west and covered much of the northern half of the U.S., giving us red suns in the middle of the afternoon and leaving only enough stars to count with two hands at night. On the bright side, the Moon is fascinating to observe.

I set up the telescope last night and spend a half hour watching this unexpected “eclipse”; sunsets appear positively atomic. The size of the smoke particles is just right for filtering out or scattering away blues, greens and even yellow from white light. Vivid reds, pinks and oranges remain to tint anything bright enough to penetrate the haze.
Fire haze satellite Aug30_edited 1

GOES-8 satellite view of the central U.S. taken at 8:15 a.m. CDT August 30, 2015 show a veil of grayish forest fire smoke covering much of the Midwest with clearer conditions to the southeast. The red line is the approximate border between the two.

But smoke can cause harm, too. Forest fire smoke contains carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and soot. On especially smoky days, you can even smell the odor of burning trees in the air at ground level.

Some may suffer from burning eyes, asthma or bronchitis on especially smoky days even a thousand miles from the source fires.

moon3

Wide-angle view of last night’s Moon. Notice that the smoke is thicker along the horizontal – left and right of the Moon. Above, at a higher elevation, we see through less smoke, so the moonlit sky is a bit brighter there. No stars are visible.

On clear, blue-sky days, I’ve watched the smoke creep in from the west. It begins a light haze and slowly covers the entire sky in a matter of several hours, often showing a banded structure in the direction of the Sun.

A little smoke is OK for observing, but once it’s thick enough to redden the Moon even hours after moonrise, you can forget about using your telescope for stargazing. Sometimes, a passing thunderstorm and cold front clears the sky again. Sometimes not.

The only cures for fire soot are good old-fashioned rain and the colder weather that arrives with fall. In the meantime, many of us will spend our evenings reading about the stars instead of looking at them.

Read the original article on Universe Today. Copyright 2015.

Source……www.business insider.com and http://www.universetoday.com

Natarajan

 

 

Image of the Day…. Blue Moon….

 

 

 

 

 

Patrick Casaert – whose community on Facebook is called La Lune The Moon – used a blue filter to capture this shot of the moon on July 27, 2015.

Blue Moon coming! As seen in the photo above by Patrick Casaert – whose community on Facebook is called La Lune The Moon – the moon has been waxing to full this week. Patrick used a blue filter to create his moon photo, and if you see the moon in tonight’s sky, you’ll see it’s nearly full … but not at all blue in color. Yet, as the second full moon for the month of July, many will call it a Blue Moon.

Calendars will say that this month’s second full moon falls tomorrow – on July 31, 2015. However, for much of North America, the moon will turn precisely full before sunrise on July 31.

Thus many will call tomorrow’s full moon – and probably tonight’s nearly full moon as well – a Blue Moon.

Will either of these moons be blue in color? Nope. The name Blue Moon has nothing to do with the color blue. It’s just a name for the second full moon in a calendar month.

If the moon won’t be blue in color tonight or tomorrow night, what will it look like? It’ll look like any ordinary full moon.

Source….www.earhskynews.org

natarajan

A Moon is a Moon….

June full moon

Full moon was Tuesday, June 2 at 12:19 p.m. EDT (16:19 UTC). From across Earth, the full moon is shining now from around sunset to dawn.

Beautiful image from our friend Nikolaos Pantazis of the rising moon on June 2, behind Poseidon's Temple in Cape Sounion, Greece.

Beautiful image from our friend Nikolaos Pantazis of the rising moon on June 2, behind Poseidon’s Temple in Cape Sounion, Greece.

Full moon on June 2, 2015 at Hartman Rocks, Gunnison, Colorado, by Matt Burt.

Full moon on June 2, 2015 at Hartman Rocks, Gunnison, Colorado, by Matt Burt.

This wonderful shot from Chris Hartley in Queensland, Australia shows the constellation Scorpius - and the planet Saturn - inside a moon halo.  Thanks, Chris!

This wonderful shot posted to EarthSky Facebook by Chris Hartley in Queensland, Australia shows the constellation Scorpius – and the planet Saturn – inside a moon halo.

Full moon setting on June 3, 2015 from France by Patrick Astronomie.

Full moon setting on June 3, 2015 from France by Patrick Astronomie.

Full moon setting on the morning of June 3 from Paco Telescopios in Spain.

Full moon setting on the morning of June 3 from Paco Telescopios in Spain.

Full moon over Rillings Hills near Colorado Springs, Colorado by Forrest Boutin Photography.

Full moon over Rillings Hills near Colorado Springs, Colorado by Forrest Boutin Photography.

Full moon rising over Tucson, Arizona by Sean Parker Photography.

Full moon rising over Tucson, Arizona by Sean Parker Photography.

June 2, 2015 full moon behind the Tower of the Americas in San Antonio, Texas, from Chicky Leclair.

June 2, 2015 full moon behind the Tower of the Americas in San Antonio, Texas, from Chicky Leclair.

 

 

Not a full moon, but pretty close, from Odilon Simões Corrêa in Brazil.

Not a full moon, but pretty close, from EarthSky Facebook Odilon Simões Corrêa in Brazil.

Source….www.earthsky.org

Natarajan